Manchester research finds that every day consuming and early kick-offs at soccer matches are linked to home violence

A new study, using data from Greater Manchester Police Department and examining Manchester United and Manchester City kick-off times, concludes that alcohol use and early whistle-blows are linked to increases in domestic violence after football matches.

The study by researchers at the Center for Economic Performance, which looked at over 800 games in the city between 2012 and 2019, found that the hourly rate of incidents fell by five percent during a game, starting to rise after the final whistle and peaking at about ten hours later.

Tom Kirchmaier, director of the center’s police and crime research group, told the Observer that, in his opinion, the results would have a “big impact” on the police and the timing of the games. “The police pushed for an early start because they are easier to monitor,” he said. “People aren’t drunk and then they’re easier to deal with. But what we are actually replacing is some kind of visible crime for invisible crime. You have less stadium crime and so on, but you have problems at home more than eight hours later.

“Then it is actually much more problematic to intervene. It also comes with fairly high economic, social, and personal costs. What we are revealing here is that these early kick-offs have big problems that no one has really thought about yet. The increase is only recorded between cohabiting partners – there was no similar increase in domestic violence by ex-partners. “

“The increase is only recorded between cohabiting partners – there was no similar increase in domestic violence by ex-partners.”

However, the researchers found that the increase in abuse was only seen when the games were scheduled for noon or afternoon, and no increase when the games started after 7:00 p.m.

The research also found that a shock loss for either Manchester club had no impact on the domestic violence rate.

Comments are closed.